A Quirky Reward of Stability in Governing

Manoj Baitha who fled to Nepal surrendered to police Wednesday morning. We’re seeing a degree of lawlessness in this country like seen never before. Lawlessness is everywhere; from Srinagar to Delhi and from Delhi to East, West, and South, straight down to God’s Own Country – Kerala. Here’s a report, for Different Truths.

Manoj Baitha, the BJP leader who killed nine children with his SUV, is a scumbag and that is his “good quality”. He doesn’t have the qualities of really good people. Like not getting drunk and driving. This lowlife had liquor in his blood and breath. And we are told liquor is banned in Nitish Kumar’s Bihar. Apparently, that is not true – bad spirits and Baitha conspired to avenge the imposition of the ban.

That spells lawlessness by any name. Baitha who fled to Nepal surrendered to police Wednesday morning. We’re seeing a degree of lawlessness in this country like seen never before. Lawlessness is everywhere; from Srinagar to Delhi and from Delhi to East, West, and South, straight down to God’s Own Country – Kerala.

Lawlessness permeates. In Delhi, the Chief Secretary gets slapped by members of the Delhi Assembly at the CM’s residence with Arvind Kejriwal watching; not caring to lift a finger to stop the Musclemen of the Legislative Assembly (MLA). That is lawlessness.

By the same token, if 2.5 lakh poor in Delhi are denied rations because their biometrics on Aadhaar does not throw up fingerprints, rendering them non-humans, then that too is lawlessness. That being said, if the CM tries to make amends by disqualifying the Aadhaar card as a verification tool for distributing rations that, again, is lawlessness.

Some would say the current lawlessness in the country started with the swearing in of the first full-majority BJP government in Independent India; an absolutely unshakeable regime in 30 years, the numbers all in its favour. For some quirky reason, the stability at the Centre has not brought law to the pieces that make the jigsaw that is India.

Why even the unprecedented presser on the lawn called by the four senior-most judges of the Supreme Court on January 12 this year pointed to lawlessness. A disturbing lack of the law on display.

The stone-throwing in Srinagar on the request of separatists is also lawlessness. When an Indian army convoy is attacked by hundreds of stone-throwers and the chief minister asks the police to lodge an FIR against an army unit which was part of the convoy, because the army unit fired in self-defence, killing three stone-throwers. That is lawlessness.

If Rohingya refugees point out breaches in boundary walls of army camps to terrorists in army uniform, resulting in the killing of unarmed army men and their family members, then that too is a sort of lawlessness which encourages treasonous civilians to break the law and pose a threat to national security.

If the army becomes a victim of lawlessness, then we might as well inform the United Nations that we’re not a country because law and order have broken, the writ of law no longer runs.

In Maharashtra, we’re told there is a special police commando group whose brief is to encourage Naxalites to surrender in return for money in the bank and the chance to live a lawful life. But this group, to notch up ‘success numbers’, is going around tribal villages, picking up men and women who were never Naxalites and asking them to “surrender”. But to the group’s misfortune, it picked up the wrong man. The steely-eyed wife of the “surrendered” innocent man swore to teach a lesson to the unpardonable perpetrators. With the help of a savvy lawyer, she exposed the commando group’s perfidy and got her husband released from its clutches. If that is not fighting lawlessness, what is?

Chhattisgarh and Andhra Pradesh have large lawless tracts. Places where the Maoist-writ runs, where security forces are forced to fight their own countrymen just so as to ensure that the law of the land prevails. Caught in the middle are the tribals whose own tribal laws went out of the window when development extended thorny fingers into the flower-scented undergrowth. Lawlessness has many faces.

Down in Tamil Nadu, the whole Jallikattu thing was a revolt against the law. The lawlessness that followed took over the Marina, forcing the Supreme Court to fix the law, the credit for which was then cornered by the party in power. All so that people could hark back to the ages when bulls with humps were bulldozed to the ground and everybody cheered including the mother of the youth with his intestines spilling out like a garland of gory glory.

Go sideways to Karnataka, and it is the son of an MLA who breaks the law by changing the contours of the face of a youth with whom he got into a barroom brawl and then followed him to the hospital to finish the job. The MLA’s son’s lawyer has now told the court that the young victim had on his own banged his face on the floor to get the special-effect effect, horribly swollen face with eyes turned to slits. Lawlessness, what else?

And if we discount the politics of murder-by-hacking practiced by political parties of all hues in South Karnataka and Kerala, then you would come up against the worst sort of lawlessness anywhere. Not even in Syria do we have youth taking selfies with a mentally-challenged youth only to lynch him because the poor hungry youth stole a bag of rice.

That Sir is lawlessness. And not long ago, in Haryana, Madhya Pradesh, Jharkhand and Rajasthan, cow vigilantes killing people on the roads because a cow mooed. And in Uttar Pradesh wayward men, with a string of crimes and bounty on their heads, have become victims of fatal encounters on the orders of the CM.

Surely, ‘Our India’, ‘Apna Desh’ is in a lawless downward spiral. And I’m not even talking of the rapes and molestation, the LoUs and the merchants of bank scams.

Sushil Kutty
©IPA Service 

Photo from the Internet

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