Science & Technology

The Story of Venetian Blinds

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Prof. Ashoka tells us how Venetian Blinds were invented. It can be traced back to the mid-18th century, but much of its early history is based on conjecture. An exclusive for Different Truths.

Venetian blinds and slat blinds are some of the most commonly used window blinds. They can be made of plastic, metal, bamboo, or even wood, with the slats, placed one on top of the other. As cords or tapes suspend the blinds, all the horizontal slats can be rotated at the same time in such a way that one slat overlaps with the other. This helps to control the amount of light flowing into the room.

Additional lift cords passing through each horizontal slat help to raise and lower the blinds. The slat widths can vary, with 25 mm being the most commonly used width.

Although patent records credit Gowin Knight and Edward Beran of England with the invention of Venetian blinds, it is believed that the French were using these blinds before them.

The Venetian blind can be traced back to the mid-18th century, but much of its early history is based on conjecture. Although patent records credit Gowin Knight and Edward Beran of England with the invention of Venetian blinds, it is believed that the French were using these blinds before them. However, the French referred to these blinds as Les Persiennes, suggesting an Asian origin.

Some accounts suggest that the Venetians, who were traders, learned about these blinds from the Persians, and it was the Venetian slaves who introduced them in France.

In 1761, St. Peter’s church in Philadelphia became the first building in the United States to be fitted with Venetian blinds.

In 1761, St. Peter’s church in Philadelphia became the first building in the United

PC : Starblindz.com

States to be fitted with Venetian blinds. John Webster is credited with being the first person in the United States to use and sell Venetian blinds in 1767. Venetian blinds then appeared in the 1787 painting by J. L. Gerome Ferris, entitled The Visit of Paul Jones to the Constitutional Convention. Other illustrations show Venetian blinds at Independence Hall in Philadelphia at the time of the signing of the US Declaration of Independence.

Between the 19th and early 20th centuries, most office buildings in the United States began using Venetian blinds to regulate the flow of light in their workspaces. During the 1930s, the Radio City Music Hall Building and the Empire State Building in New York City became the first large modern office complexes to use Venetian blinds for their windows.

The Burlington Venetian Blind Co. of Burlington, Vermont, is credited with supplying the largest single order for Venetian blinds, which were used to cover the 6,500 windows, spread over 102 floors, of the entire Empire State Building.

Photo from the Internet


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