Spotlight Celebrates Investigative Journalism

Spotlight faces a dilemma, where egos and friendships clash, as disguise and pretense filter into the language, in the Temples of God. Finally, it becomes a quest of loyalty to one’s own self. Here’s a review by Anita.

For the news of the world we breathe in to be brought to us clear and fair, we depend on media houses that have earned their position of respect in the society. That, in turn, results in a wider, loyal readership base for them. It is the very purpose of their enterprise.

And to be reliable, journalism often has to be investigative. In keeping with that we expect a certain social responsibility from them, of a thorough exposure that would bring down an unjust system.

But what happens when that very system, ironically, constitutes their reader base. Does the journalist, individually, and the media house, collectively, dare to cross lines with the community, going from insider to outsider to see the whole frightening picture?

Spotlight faces that dilemma, where egos and friendships clash, as disguise and pretense filter into the language, in the Temples of God. Finally, it becomes a quest of loyalty to one’s own self.

Watch it to see how some people will do the right thing even when it seems too long gone to care, too late to retract their actions, too exposed to accept a mistake, or too vulnerable to challenge themselves.

And watch it especially to see our fallacy in creating and upholding a system of imposed celibacy to surround God, mutating His creation, thereby spawning deviant.

My personal belief is that we must take charge and make changes to ensure the house of God is our place to lean on without being scared of falling into mire; to take the muck of politics out of the equation of a Holy institution, even if it means having nowhere to turn to God. But, in our hearts, until the place of worship is swept clean and strengthened with firm resolve and rational commandments and not just blind faith.

Palpable is the helplessness of the victims, as they struggle to reclaim their lives. And the powerlessness experienced by the investigators, as they toe the thin line between being true to themselves and to others; doing right by their profession.

Quiet, intense and fearless in their diverse craft, Stanley Tucci and Liev Schrelber particularly bear you down with their unfailing tenacity, and you carry the weight of their calling, as well as the movie, long after you’ve left the theatre.

Starring, Mark Ruffalo, Micheal Keaton, Rachel McAdams, Liev Schreiber, John Slattery, Stanley Tucci, and a host of brilliant others, this Tom McCarthy directed Oscar is not to be missed.

Pix from Net

Anita Parikh

Anita Parikh

Born and wedded, into a confluence of different cultures, Anita has lived in both, a traditionalstate and a cosmopolitan city. She has seen an assortment of unfavorable rustic practices, as much as philanthropic efforts. Her latest novel is set in this backdrop. She is a software developer and loves to dabble in digital Art.She is married to an architect. Anita is a film buff and has a good sense of humour.
Anita Parikh
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